Best Vinyl Wood Look Flooring

Best Vinyl Wood Look Flooring

Vinyl flooring is durable, easy to clean, and very affordable. It is a popular and solid choice for any kind of home or office space. Vinyl is most frequently used in kitchens and bathrooms, but some buyers like having it in every ​​​​room.

Home Adviser called vinyl flooring a synthetic cousin of laminate floors Like laminate, vinyl is resistant to stains, and durable even in high-traffic areas. Another huge benefit to having a vinyl floor is that it is absolutely water-resistant, and does not get damaged even by prolonged exposure to moisture.


Comparison Chart

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My Best Vinyl Wood Look Flooring Reviews

1. Kryptonite Farmwood Luxury Vinyl Plank Flooring 

Kryptonite Vinyl Flooring

There is one notable reason to avoid this product: Kryptonite Farmwood Luxury Vinyl Plank Flooring is currently out of stock with all major retailers in the US.

Here is a wood look for anyone looking to replicate an imposing dark brown laminate. Dark farm wood is a great option for anyone who likes a rugged or rustic look. This product might be the best vinyl wood look flooring choice for buyers who want a cozy but outdoorsy effect.

Sheet dimensions for Kryptonite Farmwood Luxury Vinyl Plank Flooring are 6.3’’ x 48’’, with a thickness of 3 mm. The product comes with samples and glue. This is an antibacterial flooring option, which makes it a good choice for clinic waiting rooms, kindergartens, etc.

Kingsport Flooring also offers matching, custom-made unfinished stair treads and architectural moldings, fit to their buyers’ specifications.

You might be able to find it on eBay, but if you want a quick and simple online ordering process, Kryptonite Farmwood Luxury Vinyl Plank Flooring is not the best vinyl wood look flooring option for you.

2. Achim Home Furnishings FTVWD22920 Nexus Self Adhesive 20 Vinyl Floor Tiles

If you are daunted by the potential messiness of using glue, self-adhesives are definitely your best bet.

If you like to set your floor down yourself, and you’re hoping to do it with no fuss, Achim Home Furnishings offers the best vinyl wood look flooring option for you.

These tiles are very easy to set. Just peel off the protective layer and stick the tiles down neatly, and you’ll get a lovely smooth effect.

The Achim Home Furnishings Nexus Self Adhesive comes in 12’’x12’’ charcoal gray wood tiles. Each tile is 1.2mm thick, and has a 0.1mm wear-layer. The tiles are matte, they do not come with a wax finish.

If you want to make a badly-lit room look brighter, this is a good color choice to go with. The charcoal gray is professional-looking, elegant, and bright.

But for buyers looking for a more natural look, this is not the best vinyl wood look flooring choice. The color might look too cool and might clash with real wooden furniture. The parquet pattern might not appeal to some.

It is important to note here that this product contains chemicals known in the state of California to cause cancer, or birth defects or other reproductive harm.

Features:

  • Self Adhesive
  • Easy To Set
  • Elegant Looking

PROS

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    Very Easy To Set
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    Lovely Smooth Effect
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    Professional, Elegant and Bright

CONS

  • Color Might Look Too Cool
  • The Parquet Pattern Might Not Appeal To Some
  • Contains Dangerous Chemicals

3. US Window And Floor USWF15 Classis Vinyl Planks

If you want to add an air of luxury to your home, US Window And Floor USWF15 Classis Vinyl Planks are the best vinyl wood look flooring choice for you.

These glue-down planks are 6’’ x 36’’ in size, and 2 mm thick. There is a 0.15 mm wear layer, for extra durability.

US Window And Floor Classis Vinyl Planks come in a beautiful silver oak, with a very realistic stained wood texture. It is a warm, rich color, which will match any style of furniture, from metallic modern designs to old-fashioned elegance. This vinyl is a great choice for any home, as well as for offices, waiting rooms, even grocery stores.

If you love the look of hardwood, but you do not want to deal with a high-maintenance, easily damaged floor, this product is absolutely the best vinyl wood look flooring for you.

It is worth noting that US Window And Floor Classis Vinyl Planks are in a higher price range than comparable products. They are also shipped without glue- make sure to calculate that in if you are budgeting.

But if you can afford them, the high-quality and luxurious design makes US Window And Floor Classis Vinyl Planks a really good investment.

Features:

  • Classy Looking
  • Realistic Stained Wood Texture
  • Extremely Durable

PROS

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    Come in a beautiful silver oak, with a very realistic stained wood texture.
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    Low Maintenance Flooring
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    High Quality

CONS

  • Higher Price Range
  • Shipped Without Glue

BUYER'S GUIDE

Searching for the Best Vinyl Wood Look Flooring

If you have decided to go with vinyl, you will find an incredible variety of styles to choose from. Wood look is a popular design choice for vinyl floors. It can evoke the elegance of laminates, or even copy the restrained beauty of hardwood floors.

The best vinyl wood look flooring brings a natural beauty into your home. According to Flooring Inc, wood look vinyl flooring is a top 2017 trend. The rising popularity of vinyl floors caused a sharp rise in quality and variety as well. 

Vinyl is the most affordable flooring option, but it varies in quality and style. If you are looking to buy wood look vinyl, you might feel overwhelmed by the huge number of choices available.

This article looks at some of the best vinyl wood look flooring on the market. Take the time to find the right option for you. Since vinyl is extremely durable, you will be stuck with the same floor for a long time so you should make sure to choose the right fit for you and your home or professional space.

FINAL VERDICT

An overview of three leading products reveals that US Window And Floor USWF15 Classis Vinyl Planks are the best vinyl wood look flooring choice for most buyers. Evoking silver oak hardwood, these planks are classy, and they are a great fit for any home or professional space. They come with a wear layer, protecting them for getting damaged in even the highest-traffic settings.

If you prefer a more rustic look, and do not mind having to go through alternative suppliers, Kryptonite Farmwood Luxury Vinyl Plank Flooring could be the best choice for you. If ease of installing is your main concern, you might want to go with Achim Home Furnishings FTVWD22920 Nexus Self Adhesive 20 Vinyl Floor Tiles.

The best vinyl wood look flooring is durable, easy to install, and it looks both impressive and elegant. All three reviewed products fit this description. You will get quality and a great visual effect from whichever one you choose.

How To Install Linoleum Flooring: The Step-By-Step Guide

After the introduction of vinyl flooring, linoleum was used less because vinyl was cheaper. However, between the two, linoleum is still considered to be more durable and environment-friendly. If maintained and cared for regularly, linoleum can last for as long as 40 years.

Linoleum is made of sustainable components such as linseed oil, tree resins, ground cork dust, mineral fillers and wood flour. It has a backing made of burlap or canvas.

It is also homogeneous, meaning the color at the surface of the linoleum is the same through to the bottom. If it gets scratched, it won’t be obvious to the eye, and you can buff it to refinish your floor.

More importantly, it comes in many patterns and colors to match any room and theme. It is stylish, affordable, sturdy and ecologically-sound. If these are the qualities that you are looking for in flooring, then linoleum is a good choice.

Every building material has a disadvantage, and for linoleum flooring, it is that it is highly sensitive to moisture. This is why if you’re installing it over concrete, you have to ensure that the surface is prepped correctly.

Fortunately, there’s a step-by-step guide you can follow on how to install linoleum flooring on different types of subfloor.

Tools And Materials Needed

Here are the tools and materials that you will need:
  • 100 lb Roller
  • Carpenter Square
  • Utility Knife
  • Floor Scraper
  • Tape Measure
  • Trowel
  • Hammer
  • Notched Trowel
  • Chalk Line
  • Mop
  • Chisel
  • Linoleum Tiles
  • Linoleum Adhesive
Step 1: Calculate How Much Linoleum You Need

Measure the area of the room in square yards. To get square yards, first calculate square feet:

Measure the length and width of the room.

Length (feet) x Width (feet) = Square Feet

Square Feet / 9 (square feet in a yard) = Square Yards

For example, a 10 ft. x 9 ft. room is 90 square feet and 10 square yards.

The amount of linoleum depends on what type of linoleum you plan to buy. Linoleum tiles will come in pieces, while linoleum sheets will come in lengths. Linoleum sheets are usually 6 to 7 ft. in width. Ask your supplier for more information.

Step 2: Remove Obstructions

Replacing the floor of an old room? First, ou need to remoce any furniture, appliances or toilet fixtures.

You also need to remove the door panels, followed by the floor baseboard.

The baseboard or floor molding can be removed using a pry bar. Pull away the remaining nails with pliers

Step 3: Remove the Subfloor and Remove Old Flooring if Necessary

It’s crucial that the subfloor is level and free from dirt and other substances before you install your linoleum floor.

If you want to cover old tiles with linoleum, you will need to reapply grout in between tile gaps to even out the surface. Allow it to dry for at least 48 hours before laying the linoleum.

If the existing floor is vinyl, you will need to remove it using a hammer and chisel. After removing the tiles, sweep off all the debris, scrape off all adhesive residue, mop off all remaining particles and then let it dry.

When installing linoleum over concrete, you need to repair all areas that might cause moisture to seep through. Otherwise, the linoleum could peel, lift or crack over time.

You also need to perform moisture and alkaline testing to double check if the surface is ready for linoleum installation.

What’s the solution for cracks and uneven concrete surface?

You need to apply a floor patch mixture using a putty knife or trowel. Smooth it over the affected surface and blend it with the surrounding concrete to even out the surface.

After that, mix the floor leveling compound with water until the recommended consistency is achieved. Pour the compound per row and spread it out evenly after each pour. Feather the edge of the compound using a trowel.

The floor leveling mixture will fix any irregularities and depressions in the concrete, resulting in an ideal flat and smooth surface.

Sand the entire floor with a course-grit sandpaper wrapped around a block of wood. This will make the concrete surface coarse, making it easier for the linoleum adhesive to stick to the surface.

Step 4: Acclimate Flooring

You might make the mistake of installing the linoleum right after you buy it.

You have to leave the linoleum at the area where it will be installed to acclimate. This is so the linoleum will adjust to the temperature and moisture content of your room. It will also prevent the flooring from warping after it’s installed.

For linoleum sheets, it is best to leave it unrolled and leave it in the room for at least two days.

Step 5A: Install Linoleum Tiles
Dry Fit the Tile

Without any adhesive, place the edge of one tile at the center or starting point. Continue with another tile and so forth until you have almost filled the entire room. Once you are convinced that you have achieved the desired floor pattern, then you can proceed with the installation.

Spread the Adhesive

Remove the tiles again and then spread adhesive on the floor with a notched trowel. Apply adhesive only within manageable areas, so it will not dry up prematurely. Continue until all the tiles have been laid, except for the tiles bordering the wall.

Cut the Tiles to Fit

For the remaining border tiles, measure from the tile line to the wall and then mark your tile with a pencil. Cut the tile using a knife and a carpenter’s square. Apply adhesive on the floor and then lay the tile with the cut edge facing the wall.

Roll the Floor

To ensure that they attach to the adhesive properly, use a heavy roller over the tiles before the adhesive dries permanently.

Step 5B: Installing Linoleum Sheet
Make a Template for Cutting

There’s no room for mistakes when cutting your linoleum sheet, since it comes in one whole piece. Before you make that cut, it is best to do it using a template first. The template can be made of newspaper glued together or of felt sheet.

Measure the room and lay the template on the surface. When there are obstacles like fixed cabinets and toilets, trace and cut the template around it.

Trace the Template onto the Linoleum

Unroll the linoleum and then place the template over it. You can either draw the template or cut the linoleum right away. Just make sure that they match perfectly. When cutting the linoleum, leave an allowance of 1/4 inch around the edges for expansion gaps.

Place the Linoleum and Roll Outward

Place the linoleum on the floor and then use a floor roller to flatten the sheet properly, eliminating wrinkles, bubbles or waves. To use, start rolling from the center, pushing it in an outward direction. You can purchase or rent the floor roller from a home improvement store.

Manage the Number of Sheets

For very large areas, you will need more than one roll to cover the floor. If this is the case, make sure that you only cut and unroll the sheets that you can install on the same day. Sheets that are cut and fit in the morning, for example, should be installed within the next five hours.

Make sure that you install the rolls in consecutive order.

The seams between rolls should be far from existing concrete joints or expansion joints. The distance should be at least 6 inches apart. The same rule applies if you’re laying linoleum over vinyl or existing linoleum. If you are installing over tile, the seams should be laid at the center of the tile.

Watch the video below to get a clearer idea on how to install linoleum sheet flooring:

Step 6: Cover the Edge

Now that you’re done installing the flooring, you can nail the baseboards back into place.

Step 7: Clean Up

Remove any excess adhesive with water if it’s still wet. Wipe it off from the tools that you’ve used as well. It the adhesive has already dried up, use a fine nylon pad with floor cleaner and water.

Wait at least 2 days before putting in furniture and allowing people to walk on the floor.

Installing linoleum flooring can be done in many ways. By using the proper tools and techniques, you can easily improve any space.

The end result is a visually appealing room, with a durable, affordable and sustainable flooring material.

Care to share your tips for installing linoleum flooring? Please comment below.

7 Easy Tips To Clean, Shine and Protect Your Vinyl Flooring

When you think about it, using vinyl flooring is one of the best choices you can make.

It’s affordable. It’s durable. It’s easy to install. But it also takes more maintenance compared to ceramic tiles. It is more prone to showing dirt and stains.

Caring for your vinyl flooring involves knowing the right methods, using the correct vinyl floor cleaners and taking preventive measures.

The result? Worth it!

Here are the things you need to know to keep your vinyl floor looking great for many years.

1. Keep Your Floor Clean

When you take the time to clean the floor at least once a week, it prevents dirt and dust from accumulating over time. Dirt can scratch and cause wear on your floor faster if left untouched.

Clean your floor daily with a broom. On some days, you can vacuum the floor. Make sure you have done either before wet cleaning with water and a sponge mop.

Move furniture around to clean the surface underneath when you do intensive cleaning. Also, make sure you clean all corners and areas along the baseboards

#2. Choose The Correct Vinyl Floor Cleaner

How do you clean vinyl floors? First, you should know what kind of floor you have. There are different types of vinyl flooring in terms of the protective layer on the surface.

1. Traditional Vinyl Floors

1. Traditional vinyl floors have a matte finish, and can be shined through waxing and buffing.

If you have this type of floor, you can keep it clean with detergent and warm water. You can also use designated cleaner for wax vinyl floors. Apply just enough pressure to remove the dirt.

Be careful not to remove the wax layer. If this happens, you will have to strip off all the wax and reapply a new coat. Afterwards, rinse the detergent off with cold water.​

2. No-Wax Vinyl

1. No-wax vinyl flooring is now more popular because it is easier to maintain. It has a protective wear layer so it doesn’t get stained or scratched easily.

Many recommend using microfiber mops for daily cleaning. Dust the floor before damp mopping the surface.

There are cleaning solutions made specifically for no-wax floors such as those from Armstrong or Trewax. Use them and follow the instructions on the container. Stay away from strong, abrasive or heavy-duty cleaners. They can strip away the shine of the top layer.

3. Urethane Protective Layer

A urethane protective layer is tougher than no-wax vinyl. The coating lasts longer and doesn’t require the use of a polishing solution. Damp mopping should be sufficient in maintaining its shine and appearance.

3. Use Vinegar As A Homemade Alternative

Vinegar as a homemade vinyl floor cleaner is a great yet affordable option for cleaning vinyl floors. It has the correct level of acidity needed in removing dirt and grime.

At the same time, it doesn’t strip off the wax layer or leave behind any soap residue.

To clean vinyl floors with vinegar, simply mix one cup of vinegar with a gallon of hot water. Keep your mop at a damp level and frequently rinse the mop with warm water.

Avoid using red wine vinegar or white wine vinegar, because they are highly acidic and high in salt content. This can damage your vinyl flooring after some time.

The best type of vinegar to use is apple cider vinegar, because it also serves as a disinfectant.

You can add a few drops of dishwashing liquid to the solution for extra strength when cleaning off dirt. Wipe off the soap by mopping a second time with only vinegar and water.

4. Avoid Using Certain Types Of Vinyl Floor Cleaners And Tools

You have to know the products that are harmful to your floor.

Do not use steel wool scrubbers or pads that are as coarse. You also should not use detergents, because they can leave residue on the floor. 

Avoid incompatible mop-and-shine cleaners, wax and other solvent-based polishers. Avoid cleaning vinyl floors with ammonia at all costs. It is a toxic substance that can cause respiratory problems or failure. It can also cause skin and eye irritation.

Do not use a steam cleaner. Moisture and high temperatures can lead to expansion of the vinyl and can affect its adhesion to the substrate flooring

5. Follow These Other Stain Removing Tips

Here are more solutions for how to remove stains from vinyl floors:

  • For stubborn scratch or graze marks, add some cleaning lubricant or jojoba oil to a cloth and rub it on the affected area. When it disappears, cleanse the area with a vinegar and water solution
  • For food stains like ketchup, mustard and other sauces, mix baking soda and water and rub the area gently; rinse it afterwards
  • To remove lipstick stains, hair color or ink stains, wipe them with rubbing alcohol
  • To remove crayon, paint and marker stains, use mineral spirits
  • To remove nail polish stains, simply use acetone or nail polish remover
  • If a cloth doesn’t work, try using a nylon-bristle brush to remove stains

6. Restore Shine From Time To Time

Over time, your vinyl flooring will start to lose its shine and luster. So how do you restore old vinyl flooring? By making it shine.

The same rule of using the right cleaning solution applies. Use the correct polishing remedy for wax or no-wax vinyl flooring.

Before you start applying wax or polish, sweep the floor to remove dirt and dust. And then damp mop the floor with warm water.

Deal with tough stains by using a vinegar solution, rubbing alcohol, baking soda, etc., depending on the type of stain.

Here are the steps to polishing your no-wax vinyl floor after initial prepping:

  1. Choose a polish that is compatible with your floor; preferably the same brand as your floor.
  2. ​Apply the first coat using a high quality mop or manufacturer-recommended applicator.
  3. Wait around 30 minutes until the polish is dry.
  4. ​Apply the second coat. Always refer to product instructions.
  5. Wait for at least one hour before stepping on the floor.
  6. Wait for several more hours before bringing the furniture back in.

Watch the video below for interactive advice on how to restore shine to a no-wax floor:

If you have an older floor that requires waxing, here are the steps you can follow:

  1. Remove or strip the old wax layer using a stripping solution​. Mix it with water in a large bucket as prescribed on the label.
  2. Wet the mop or rag with the stripping solution and then spread it on the floor. Let the solution set for around 15 minutes.
  3. Scrub the floor with a stripping pad or stripping brush. For large areas, you can use a scrubbing machine.
  4. ​Rinse the stripping solution with water and wipe it dry. Rinse it out as soon as possible so the solution won’t set on the floor.
  5. Take note that you shouldn’t strip your floor more than twice a year.
  6. Apply 2 coats of wax as per the manufacturer’s instructions. One example is wax from Lundmark.
  7. You can buff the floor after, but it is optional.

7. Protect Your Floor

Maintaining a good-looking floor goes hand in hand with protecting your floor from dirt and scratches. Protection will make a lot of difference in the life of your floor.

If you’re not careful with the dust and dirt that comes in contact with your vinyl floor, it can wear out faster than it should.

Here are some easy-to-follow techniques on how to protect vinyl flooring:

  1. Place a doormat along entryways and high traffic points to minimize, if not eliminate, grit from the shoes of anyone entering the house or room. Use mats without rubber backing to prevent discoloration of your floor.
  2. Wipe up spills as soon as they occur.
  3. Lessen direct exposure to sunlight. Close sun shades or curtains if you don’t need natural lighting.
  4. ​Use shampoo to remove any hairspray buildup.
  5. Use only a little water when cleaning. Don’t let it flood with too much water, or it will slip through the joints and weaken the bond between the adhesive and the floor.
  6. ​Add floor protectors to your heavy furniture and large appliances to prevent dents in your vinyl flooring.
  7. Avoid using furniture with caster wheels, because they can scratch the surface of your vinyl tiles. It is recommended that you use felt covers instead.
  8. When moving around large furniture or appliances, provide a plywood cover along the path first. This will prevent your floor from damage, as the tendency is to drag these items rather than lift them.
  9. When using a vacuum cleaner, do not attach the beater bar.
  10. ​Most importantly, implement a daily, weekly and monthly cleaning routine. Regular cleaning and maintenance is key to protecting your floor and keeping its original quality intact. As a general rule, broom daily, damp mop weekly, and polish when needed.

The condition of the vinyl floor you have reflects how you care for your home. For that reason, you need to clean, shine and protect your floor.

Using the tips I’ve mentioned above will help you accomplish this task. As you put in time and effort to care for your floor, it will last for years and will continue looking brand new.

It won’t take long for your friends to notice how lovely your floor is, and they may even ask you how you did it.

What techniques have you tried when cleaning your vinyl floor? Which of them do you think worked best for you

Cheap Linoleum

If you are looking to redo a floor in your home, you may have considered linoleum, especially if you are looking for a cheaper floor. Yes, it is true, you can find linoleum that is much cheaper than all of the other flooring options. While cheap linoleum may seem like the natural option, you should know everything that is included in the cheap price.

Now, this is not meant to talk you out of purchasing cheap linoleum. It is merely a way of showing you what you are getting for your dollar. After all, linoleum does offer the option of variety and it does not tend to discolor from sunlight. For some, this type of floor might be entirely worth it, but others may opt for something else.

That being said, I have put together a list of the things I believe you should know before purchasing cheap linoleum

Not As Resistant

You probably are not surprised that even the nicer linoleum is not exactly known for being the most durable. Compared to other floors, it can dent and crack much easier. Now, imagine the cheap linoleum. If linoleum in general is known for not being resistant, it stands to reason the less money you spend on it, the weaker it will get.

It Is Applied To The Floor Weakly

Unlike most floors, linoleum is applied to your subfloor by merely using construction adhesive. This means that in time, the corners of the floor could begin to lift. Rooms that have a lot of traffic, especially a kitchen, tend to make the floor separate from the seams much quicker. Other floors have a much better way of application that will help them last longer.

It Can Melt And Burn

Unlike a tile or an engineered flooring, linoleum can melt or burn pretty easily. If you drop a hot pan on a tile floor, there is no issue, but if you drop a hot pan on a linoleum floor you can very easily burn it. Too much heat from something can cause it to melt, this hurts the durability of the floor, meaning you may have to replace it much sooner than you anticipate. In kitchens, the last thing you likely want to have to worry about is melting or burning your floor while you are completing every day task.

It Can Have A Negative Reaction To Cleaners

It is true, maintaining your cheap linoleum floor would be pretty simple. All you have to do is sweep or vacuum it regularly and mop it regularly. Sounds simple enough, right? However, you should know that linoleum is a sensitive floor. This means you need to be extra careful when choosing a floor cleaner to use. You want to make sure that you are choosing one that will work well with the sensitive floor so that you do not discolor or damage it in any way. This may not seem like a big problem, but it is something you shouldn’t really have to deal with, right.

It Has A Shorter Lifespan Than Most Other Floors

When it comes to lifespan, you want to spend your hard earned money on a floor that will exceed your money’s worth if at all possible. You want a floor that will last a long, long time. And if this is what you want, linoleum flooring is not the right choice for you. When comparing the lifespan of linoleum with other floors, it just does not make the cut. On average, a linoleum floor could last 25 years. That doesn’t sound so bad, right? Well, when you compare it to the average life of some of the other floorings, you’ll think differently. Engineered wood lasts 50 or more years on average, any time of plain wood floor lasts 100 or more years on average, and tile lasts 75-100 years on average. When you compare that to linoleum’s measly 25 years, it just doesn’t compare. You want a floor that will truly last.

Now, as I said before, I don’t mean to talk you out of buying cheap linoleum flooring because there are certainly some benefits. And maybe you only intend to lay linoleum down until you have saved enough for a more lasting floor. Or maybe you just like linoleum and you believe the benefits outweigh the negatives. Regardless, I hope you make the choice that is best for you home, family, and budget.

Vinyl Plank Flooring Installation

You might have heard about how easy it is to put in a glueless laminate flooring installation. It was designed to be accommodating for DIY enthusiasts who do not put flooring in very often. Pretty much all you have to do is make sure it goes in straight and interlocks smoothly. However, we've found that putting in glueless laminate flooring is not quite like putting a puzzle together and hoping for the best. It's fairly easy for beginners to make these common mistakes that might lead to having to redo the flooring installation.

5 Common Mistakes When Installing Vinyl Flooring

1. Forgetting to Store the Flooring in the Room For a Few Days

It's understandable if you brought home the new flooring and want to install it right away. However, most experts recommend waiting a few days because it needs time to adjust to conditions in the room. If possible, keep the temperature of the room between 65 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit while storing and installing it. This is especially a concern if you live in a climate that might cause the laminate to expand or warp, so it does help to calculate for this expansion when putting in your new flooring.

2. Cutting the Laminate in a Way That Leads to Chipping

If the laminate is not cut properly, it can cause chipping in the top layer of the laminate, which can lead to a more unsightly surface damage over time. The top layer is a printed design on a thin material that is very easy to damage if cut from the bottom or in a way that could make the entire end of the board uneven. Make sure you use a saw with a blade that is as sharp as possible and cut into the face with the printed surface on top so that any chips will be less likely to be exposed.

3. Not Knowing That the Pattern Repeats Itself

Most laminate makes use of only a few printed patterns. Putting two planks with the same pattern beside one another is actually a pretty easy mistake to make, but you'll definitely notice later when you see that two side-by-side boards look practically identical with maybe a slight variation in color from having been made in two different batches. Laminate is never going to fool an expert who knows how to look for the difference between laminate and natural hardwood, but it looks especially fake if it was installed in a way that puts two identical patterns beside one another. A lot of people solve this problem by arranging boards from two or more different boxes in a way that no two boards from the same box will be installed beside one another.

4. Forgetting About the Underlayment

The underlayment can shift, especially if you're walking on it a lot between the time you take up the old flooring and the time you have your new flooring completely installed. The underlayment may also have been damaged by exposure to hidden water deposits or normal wear and tear. These are issues that might cause unnecessary degradation in your glueless laminate flooring installation if the underlayment is not repaired or replaced before you put it in. If you are uncertain about the condition of your underlayment, an expert can point out any issues that will need to be addressed before you can safely put in the glueless laminate flooring installation.

5. Trying to Force a Locking Mechanism That Won't Go in Easily

This is where you can carry over some techniques for putting together a picture puzzle. If it goes in easily, it fits and you can lock it firmly into place. If it doesn't, you're going to damage an ill-fitting “puzzle piece” by trying to force it into place. Most of the time, this won't be a problem because the glueless laminate is designed to fit together like completely identical puzzle pieces. Sometimes, though, you might run into a piece that won't go in easily. A lot of the time, this can be solved by sanding the piece where the problem exists or just using another piece.

Putting in a glueless laminate floor installation is actually pretty easy if you can avoid these five mistakes. Its interlocking pattern was designed for people who would rather save money on the installation by doing it themselves. One thing we like to tell beginning DIY floor installers is to take their time so that they can avoid making a mistake that could lead to damage of their new flooring over time.

The Types of Vinyl Flooring – That You Need to Know – TheFlooringlady

vinyl-flooring

Installing New Vinyl Flooring

Whether you are using vinyl tile or roll flooring, installing vinyl floors is a matter of patience and planning to execute a beautiful finish. Installing vinyl floors is more than just a weekend chore, it’s an investment in the protection of your home. A little time from you can result in a lot of long-term use from your new vinyl flooring.

The advantages of installing vinyl flooring include:
  • Quick! Installing vinyl floors doesn't take a lot of your time.
  • Cheap! Materials needed for the floors and the installation are inexpensive.
Deterrents to installing vinyl floors can be:
  • Tools: You will need to have basic tools on hand for cutting and measuring.
  • Pre-Installation Prep: There is some prep work that will need to be done prior to starting installation to get the floor ready.
  • Leveling: You may need to level the floor to make it conductive to laying the vinyl. This can be a fairly involved and tedious process.
  • Toxicity: Off-gassing from the vinyl and/or adhesive can be an issue if the are where you are laying the flooring is not well ventilated.

Why Choose Vinyl For Your Flooring

Vinyl is an incredibly durable form of floor covering. It comes in fantastic colors, designs and patterns, and can really add some wow-factor to what may otherwise be a boring utility space, like a mud room or a laundry room. Vinyl is also a wonderful option for rooms where water damage is a possibility, such as a bathroom, basement, or even a kitchen. Vinyl floors can stand up to harsh treatment and conditions without needing anything more than a wipe.

When determining if it is time to re-lay vinyl floors, what you have to take into consideration is the wear layer of the flooring, which is the surface that stands between someone’s sole and the actual vinyl surface. This protective layer can be worn down with time, especially in locations where dirt is most prone to being ground into the floor, like at the front or back door. If the flooring that is in place seems to be worn, this is a good indication that it is time to replace the vinyl flooring. The good news is, relaying vinyl flooring over existing vinyl is very simple! Even if the flooring that is currently in your home is not vinyl, this is a home renovation project that can be completed in the span of a weekend; you just may be required to do a little additional prep work.

Tile Vinyl or Roll Vinyl. Which is the Right Choice for Your Install

Installing vinyl flooring seems to be the way that most homeowners decorate and protect their bathrooms and basement floors. One big decision is, whether you will be laying tile or roll vinyl. Either one is quite simple to do. While laying tiles may be a bit easier than the roll vinyl, either one can be done with a little patience and preparation. The determining factor for you should really come down to the final look of the room, the room’s use, and your personal preference. Vinyl tile has almost limitless design possibilities, as the tiles can be laid in any configuration. But, if you are really looking for the best deal possible, sheet vinyl comes in a little bit under the price of the vinyl tiles per square footage. Of course, if this is going to be a room with a lot of traffic and you want to get long term mileage out of your vinyl flooring, you may want to pay the additional cost for the tiles, as it is much easier to replace a single tile if there is any damage to the flooring than it would be to replace an entire sheet.

The Best in Vinyl

Vinyl flooring is easy to use, it's hard wearing and tough, while still being beautiful to look at.

It's not about whether or not to use vinyl for flooring, but simply which vinyl you should be using!​

The Best Vinyl Tiles

Installing New Vinyl Flooring: A How-to-Guide

1. Test for Excessive Moisture and Good Ventilation

The preparations needed include selecting a room that isn’t too hot and is well-ventilated. Bathrooms are a good example because they have exhaust fans that vent moisture and will help keep the space well ventilated while you are working. You will need a clean and dry surface upon which to install the vinyl floor. If you’re installing vinyl on top of preexisting vinyl, then you just need to clean the area well and allow it to dry completely before installing the new flooring.

If you’re installing vinyl tiles on a concrete basement floor, or other concrete surface, you will want to do this simple test: take a small piece of vinyl tile and attach it to the floor. After seventy-two hours, try to pull the tile up. If the tile comes up without much trouble, the surface is not dry enough for installing vinyl floor tiles. You will need to find a way to remove the excess moisture; using a dehumidifier for a few days may do the trick. It could be that a high water table causing the moisture is the problem, and that can be more difficult and expensive to fix.

2. Measure Out the Space Carefully

Take careful measurements of the area to assure that you have enough vinyl floor tiles. You may want to purchase more than is necessary to adjust for any mistakes that you may make and to have extras on hand in the event of damage down the road. As any pro will tell you, always measure twice! If there are any discrepancies between your first and second measure, measure two more times until you get the same number both times. This may seem tedious now, but it’s certainly better than a repeat trip to the store for additional vinyl after you have already started the install, or ending up with more leftover than is necessary!

3. Prepare the Temperature of the Room and Floor

One trick to use before you start to lay your vinyl flooring is to turn the heat on to 75 degrees and leave the flooring product (and glue) in that room for 72 hours prior to installation and throughout the installation job. That lets both the product and the floor get warm enough that the vinyl is flexible and everything is the same temperature. By having the floor and product the same temperature, they adhere to each other better. After you have finished installation, when you return the hear to your regular setting, the floor and flooring cool together, and as the vinyl shrinks (that's what happens when things cool), it is pulled taught, making an even tighter contact.

4. Level the Floor

When you are installing vinyl floors on top of old vinyl floors, you may need a special leveling paste. This is especially true when you are installing vinyl floor tiles, fill these areas with the manufacturer's recommended dry floor filler, allow drying, and then proceed with the installation.

5. Remove Floor Molding and/or Baseboards

Another thing that you can do to ensure your vinyl floors look great is to carefully remove the floor molding, or baseboards. By removing the molding you make it possible to place the vinyl very close to the wall so that when the baseboards are replaced it looks professionally completed. Or, you can replace the baseboards with new material, completing the fresh, new look.

Once the baseboard is removed and the floor prepped, snap a chalk line so you have a straight line to work from, ensuring your vinyl is laid straight. That gives your finished floor a professional look.​

Installing the Vinyl Floor

You are now ready to begin the install! If you are using roll vinyl, roll your vinyl across the room. Mark where you will cut off excess material or cut around intrusions such as toilets, built-in bookcases, or walls. Using a solid backing board, cut out the pieces you just marked, carefully rolling the vinyl so you can access those spots. You can use either a perimeter or full adhesion technique. For the full adhesion technique, roll the vinyl up with the decorative side facing inwards. Spread the “glue” across the entire floor, unroll the vinyl onto the floor, and use a roller to ensure all of the vinyl is pressed to the glue. It takes a bit of effort, but if you work slowly, carefully and methodically, this is a very efficient way to achieve a fantastic, even look for the flooring.

To lay vinyl flooring tiles, place your tiles down in the immediate area you are working. Depending on the type of adhesion method you are using, either put adhesive on the floor where the tile will go or peel off the glue-down backing, and put the tile in place. Push firmly. Proceed to the next tile. Laying vinyl flooring tiles is a cinch, but you will still want to work cautiously and take your time. Once the floor is in place and has had time to cure, put baseboards in place. The project is done!

For more detailed installation directions, rely on your flooring manufacturer’s directions, or find a do-it-yourself website that gives you step by step directions with pictures or follow a video like this one:

Installing vinyl flooring doesn’t need to be a chore. It’s a great way to create a beautiful room that really pops! And with all of the advantages of vinyl flooring, who wouldn’t be willing to commit a weekend to this simple project that can really protect your home’s value and usability!

Background and History of Asbestos Vinyl

Asbestos vinyl flooring was widely used until 1972. Vinyl is made from a combination of ethylene and chlorine that result into a plastic resin. Back then, asbestos was the additional component that improves its strength and insulating properties. Apart from vinyl flooring, asbestos was also used in wallpapers and ceiling tiles.

If the vinyl is intact, it doesn’t pose any threat. However, problems started to arise when floorings are cut, damaged, or get worn out through time. Back then, those most susceptible to having asbestos related diseases were vinyl factory workers, floor installers and construction workers.

Until 1972, asbestos was used in a variety of building material such as roofing, exterior siding, window sills and linings, and vinyl flooring. Asbestos is a group of minerals known for their strength, flame/heat resistance, and indestructibility, and was considered ideal for insulation and fireproofing. However, once it was discovered that asbestos fibers can result in severe illness and disease when inhaled, the use of asbestos was banned by the EPA.

How To Check If There Is Asbestos Flooring In Your Home

Unless clearly marked on the product’s label, asbestos is impossible to identify without examining a sample under a microscope.

A. Size of Tile

One easy way for you to know if it is an asbestos vinyl is through the size of the tile. Before the 1990s, these tiles were manufactured in 3 sizes: 9 x 9 inches, 12 x 12 inches, and 18 x 18 inches. At present, standard square vinyl tiles are only 12 x 12 inches.

B. Brand of Tile

If you can still find out which brand of tiles was installed, here are some brands that manufactured asbestos flooring: Excelon, Fashionflor, Flor-Ever, Gold Seal, KenFlex, KenTile, Sears and Solarian.

C. Laboratory Testing

Testing for asbestos vinyl flooring can be done by a professional asbestos contractor or by using a do-it-yourself sampling kit.

  • First, you would need to cut off a portion of you vinyl flooring as a sample. Spray water mixed with liquid detergent on the are where you're going to cut the sample from. The mist will ensure that asbestos fibers will not dissipate into the air.
  • Using a utility knife, cut a small strip of the tile, around 1/8 x 1 inch in size. Cut all the way to the bottom so you can include the backing and the adhesive in the sample.
  • Place the sample into the bag and ship it back to the testing laboratory.
  • Wait for the result and if the sample consists of more than 1% asbestos, then it means your floor does contain asbestos.

Your Options: Removal Or Installing A New Floor On Top

If your asbestos vinyl flooring is chipped, crumbling, or frayed, it must be removed before laying a new floor. The asbestos fibers from the damaged floor can cause health concerns when the fibers are released into the air. However, intact asbestos vinyl flooring should not be removed because the removal of an intact floor poses a greater risk than simply covering over the old flooring. Leaving the old floor as is will be the most safe action you could take because you’re not disturbing the asbestos in the material.

Considerations and Risks Before Removal

If you determine that the asbestos vinyl flooring must be removed, asbestos abatement contractors are highly recommended. Homeowners living in a single family home may also remove the asbestos but legally, family members and friends who help must do so voluntarily and without pay. Moreover, if you as a homeowner are not confident in your ability to safely remove the asbestos vinyl flooring, hire a certified asbestos abatement contractor. Asbestos removal is difficult work, and can be physically demanding and potentially dangerous to your health.

Asbestos fibers are up to 1,200 times finer than human hair and when inhaled, they can directly penetrate your lungs. Even after 3 decades of inhalation, asbestos can lead to lung cancer, mesothelioma, breathing problems and heart failure. Even the slightest exposure to asbestos can be risky, that is why medical experts emphasize taking precautionary measures when dealing with asbestos in home improvement projects.

Tools And Gear Needed For DIY Removal

If you’ve accepted the health dangers involved, you can minimize the risk of exposure to asbestos fibers for do-it-yourself removal by wearing safety equipment such as a respirator, coveralls, gloves, rubber boots and safety goggles. You need to fasten your gloves to the coveralls with tape, to make sure that they won't come off. Plus, tools such as spray bottles, liquid detergent, putty knifes, a utility knife, a still floor scraper, plastic sheeting, duct tape, plastic garbage bags, a mop, and disposable towels will be needed.

Check out this DIY video on how asbestos vinyl floor tiles are removed.

You can do better than the woman in the video by wearing the other required protective equipment. Note that breathing through a respirator can be challenging and the coveralls can be uncomfortable. Removing the tiles on your own will be time consuming. On average, a 2 square-meter area can take around 1 to 2 days. Do take careful consideration before embarking on a DIY floor removal project.

Steps in Removing Asbestos Flooring: How It's Done

Step 1: Protect the Area

The goal in removing the asbestos vinyl flooring is to remove it in whole pieces without causing any dust.

  • Before beginning, the work area must be isolated using the plastic sheet over heat registers, doorways, cupboards, ect. and the heating and air conditions system must be turned off.
  • All furniture and other moveable objects should be removed from the room to prevent contamination and to simplify clean-up.
  • Access to the work area should be limited to one doorway, with a slit in the plastic door covering to make the entrance as small as possible.
  • Post a sign outside the house or inform your friends and relatives that they cannot visit the house at this time.
  • Keep the pets away from the work area as well.
  • To further prevent asbestos fibers from spreading, the floor must be kept wet using a water bottle. The water will also help loosen the tiles and make removal much easier.
  • Keep your supplies ready near the doorway, which includes water bottles, rags, buckets and trash bags.
Step 2: Removal
  • Once prepped and your safety gear on, cut the vinyl flooring into the manageable sections with a utility knife, and remove the pieces by pealing from the edges and using a flat scraper to lift the vinyl.
  • Continue to wet the flooring as you scrape and pull to minimize dust. Any vinyl backing that separates from the vinyl flooring can be removed by thoroughly wetting and scrubbing the floor with a pad.
Step 3: Clean Up and Disposal
  • As you remove the vinyl, place the pieces in sturdy plastic trash bags to avoid leakage and mark the bags "Danger! Asbestos-Containing Materials." Regulation also states that you should write your last name, address and removal date on the trash bag. The trash bags should be 33 x 50 inches in size and should be 6-mil thick polyethylene.
  • The asbestos debris can only be disposed of in a landfill that accepts asbestos-containing waste. Consider calling the land-fill before you go to ensure you understand all their requirements.
  • Careful clean-up is important when dealing with asbestos, and all potential asbestos dust and particulate must be removed from the work area to avoid future asbestos contamination.
  • Wet and remove all debris left on the plastic sheet used to cover the counters, furniture, and equipment. Then roll them carefully and place them inside the trash bags.
  • Twist the top of the bags and then seal them with duct tape.
  • Wipe all surfaces and scraping tools with a damp cloth. Frequently rinse the cloth and change the water so that the surface in the work area can get truly clean. Once you're done with the rags, dispose them properly.
  • Collect all your tools and put them in a bucket or plastic bag, so you can clean them later.
  • Next, stand on a plastic sheet and spray yourself or your companion with water to wash down any remaining asbestos fibers. Only then will you be able to remove your respirator, gloves, boots, goggles and coveralls.
  • Place your towels, mop heads, and coverall suit and gloves in the disposal bag. You can dispose of the boots or place in a plastic bag for cleaning later. Remove the filters in your respirator and dispose of them.
  • To ensure that your skin and hair is free of asbestos, immediately take a complete shower and wash carefully.

Why Armstrong Vinyl Flooring is more superior to other floorings?

vinyl flooring is more superior to other floorings
Armstrong vinyl flooring is made by Armstrong World Industries. Based in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Armstrong operates 39 plants in 10 countries and has approximately 13,000 employees worldwide. In 2006, Armstrong’s net sales were $3.42 billion, with operating income of $210.8 million. That’s pretty good for a company that emerged from Chapter 11 bankruptcy in October, 2006!

 

Armstrong vinyl flooring is only one of many products that Armstrong World Industries has made during its nearly 150 year history. In 1860, Thomas H. Armstrong, the son of Scots-Irish immigrants from Londonderry, Ireland, joined with John D. Glass to open a one-room shop in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, carving bottle stoppers from cork by hand. Armstrong was a shrewd businessman. He branded every cork that left his shop, and soon included a written guarantee in every bag of corks. The company grew to be the world’s largest supplier of corks by 1890.

 

Read moreWhy Armstrong Vinyl Flooring is more superior to other floorings?

Best of the choices to choose the Vinyl Tile Flooring options

vinyl tile flooring
Vinyl tile flooring has come a long way in the last ten or fifteen years. There are more choices of materials, colors, textures, and better durability than ever before. That is part of the reason it has become increasingly popular. It also comes in a variety of price ranges, which is good news for people who are on a budget, because they can find a vinyl flooring choice in their price range.

 

One of the most common styles of vinyl tile flooring includes those that mimic ceramic tile floors. These tiles look much like ceramic tile, complete with the fake grout line, but they are warmer and softer to walk on, cost much less, and are easier to install. They come in every color that you can imagine from neutral colors to more noticeable colors to help you find the exact look and feel that you want for your room.

Read moreBest of the choices to choose the Vinyl Tile Flooring options

Removing Asbestos Vinyl Flooring

flooring header

Background and History of Asbestos Vinyl

Asbestos vinyl flooring was widely used until 1972. Vinyl is made from a combination of ethylene and chlorine that result into a plastic resin. Back then, asbestos was the additional component that improves its strength and insulating properties. Apart from vinyl flooring, asbestos was also used in wallpapers and ceiling tiles.

If the vinyl is intact, it doesn’t pose any threat. However, problems started to arise when floorings are cut, damaged, or get worn out through time. Back then, those most susceptible to having asbestos related diseases were vinyl factory workers, floor installers and construction workers.

Don't Guess - Test and Have Peace of Mind!

When the dangers of asbestos became an issue, then careful vinyl flooring asbestos removal became an issue. One option is just covering asbestos flooring with the new flooring material like carpet, vinyl tiles or sheet vinyl, laminate or hardwood flooring, or even ceramic tiles and stone.

Testing for asbestos in vinyl flooring can be done by professionals or by yourself to determine “is there asbestos in my vinyl flooring” or not. Asbestos in vinyl flooring isn’t the end of the world, but asbestos and vinyl flooring do cause concern for your health. Use precaution if you elect to remove asbestos vinyl flooring so that its potential doesn’t become your reality.


Until 1972, asbestos was used in a variety of building material such as roofing, exterior siding, window sills and linings, and vinyl flooring. Asbestos is a group of minerals known for their strength, flame/heat resistance, and indestructibility, and was considered ideal for insulation and fireproofing. However, once it was discovered that asbestos fibers can result in severe illness and disease when inhaled, the use of asbestos was banned by the EPA.

How to Check if There is Asbestos Flooring in Your Home.


Unless clearly marked on the product’s label, asbestos is impossible to identify without examining a sample under a microscope.

A. Size of Tile

One easy way for you to know if it is an asbestos vinyl is through the size of the tile. Before the 1990s, these tiles were manufactured in 3 sizes: 9 x 9 inches, 12 x 12 inches, and 18 x 18 inches. At present, standard square vinyl tiles are only 12 x 12 inches.

B. Brand of Tile

If you can still find out which brand of tiles was installed, here are some brands that manufactured asbestos flooring: Excelon, Fashionflor, Flor-Ever, Gold Seal, KenFlex, KenTile, Sears and Solarian.

C. Laboratory Testing

Testing for asbestos vinyl flooring can be done by a professional asbestos contractor or by using a do-it-yourself sampling kit.

  • First, you would need to cut off a portion of your vinyl flooring as a sample. Spray water mixed with liquid detergent on the area where you're going to cut the sample from. The mist will ensure that asbestos fibers will not dissipate into the air.
  • Using a utility knife, cut a small strip of the tile, around 1/8 x 1 inch in size. Cut all the way to the bottom so you can include the backing and the adhesive in the sample.
  • Place the sample into the bag and ship it back to the testing laboratory.
  • Wait for the result and if the sample consists of more than 1% asbestos, then it means your floor does contain asbestos.

Your Options: Removal or Installing a New Floor On Top

If your asbestos vinyl flooring is chipped, crumbling, or frayed, it must be removed before laying a new floor. The asbestos fibers from the damaged floor can cause health concerns when the fibers are released into the air. However, intact asbestos vinyl flooring should not be removed because the removal of an intact floor poses a greater risk than simply covering over the old flooring. Leaving the old floor as is will be the most safe action you could take because you’re not disturbing the asbestos in the material.

Considerations and Risks Before Removal

If you determine that the asbestos vinyl flooring must be removed, asbestos abatement contractors are highly recommended. Homeowners living in a single family home may also remove the asbestos but legally, family members and friends who help must do so voluntarily and without pay. Moreover, if you as a homeowner are not confident in your ability to safely remove the asbestos vinyl flooring, hire a certified asbestos abatement contractor. Asbestos removal is difficult work, and can be physically demanding and potentially dangerous to your health.

Asbestos fibers are up to 1,200 times finer than human hair and when inhaled, they can directly penetrate your lungs. Even after 3 decades of inhalation, asbestos can lead to lung cancer, mesothelioma, breathing problems and heart failure. Even the slightest exposure to asbestos can be risky, that is why medical experts emphasize taking precautionary measures when dealing with asbestos in home improvement projects.

Tools and Gears Needed for DIY Removal

If you’ve accepted the health dangers involved, you can minimize the risk of exposure to asbestos fibers for do-it-yourself removal by wearing safety equipment such as a respirator, coveralls, gloves, rubber boots and safety goggles. You need to fasten your gloves to the coveralls with tape, to make sure that they won't come off. Plus, tools such as spray bottles, liquid detergent, putty knifes, a utility knife, a still floor scraper, plastic sheeting, duct tape, plastic garbage bags, a mop, and disposable towels will be needed. 

Check out this DIY video on how asbestos vinyl floor tiles are removed.

You can do better than the woman in the video by wearing the other required protective equipment. Note that breathing through a respirator can be challenging and the coveralls can be uncomfortable. Removing the tiles on your own will be time consuming. On average, a 2 square-meter area can take around 1 to 2 days. Do take careful consideration before embarking on a DIY floor removal project.

Steps in Removing Asbestos Flooring

Step 1: Protect The Area

The goal in removing the asbestos vinyl flooring is to remove it in whole pieces without causing any dust.

  • Before beginning, the work area must be isolated using the plastic sheet over heat registers, doorways, cupboards, ect. and the heating and air conditions system must be turned off.
  • All furniture and other moveable objects should be removed from the room to prevent contamination and to simplify clean-up.
  • Access to the work area should be limited to one doorway, with a slit in the plastic door covering to make the entrance as small as possible.
  • Post a sign outside the house or inform your friends and relatives that they cannot visit the house at this time.
  • Keep the pets away from the work area as well.
  • To further prevent asbestos fibers from spreading, the floor must be kept wet using a water bottle. The water will also help loosen the tiles and make removal mush easier.
  • Keep your supplies ready near the doorway, which includes water bottles, rags, buckets and trash bags.
Step 2: Removal
  • Once prepped and your safety gear on, cut the vinyl flooring into the manageable sections with a utility knife, and remove the pieces by pealing from the edges and using a flat scraper to lift the vinyl.
  • Continue to wet the flooring as you scrape and pull to minimize dust. Any vinyl backing that separates from the vinyl flooring can be removed by thoroughly wetting and scrubbing the floor with a pad.
Step 3: Clean Up and Disposal
  • As you remove the vinyl, place the pieces in sturdy plastic trash bags to avoid leakage and mark the bags "Danger! Asbestos-Containing Materials." Regulation also states that you should write your last name, address and removal date on the trash bag. The trash bags should be 33 x 50 inches in size and should be 6-mil thick polyethylene.
  • The asbestos debris can only be disposed of in a landfill that accepts asbestos-containing waste. Consider calling the land-fill before you go to ensure you understand all their requirements.
  • Careful clean-up is important when dealing with asbestos, and all potential asbestos dust and particulate must be removed from the work area to avoid future asbestos contamination.
  • Wet and remove all debris left on the plastic sheet used to cover the counters, furniture, and equipment. Then roll them carefully and place them inside the trash bags.
  • Twist the top of the bags and then seal them with duct tape.
  • Wipe all surfaces and scraping tools with a damp cloth. Frequently rinse the cloth and change the water so that the surface in the work area can get truly clean. Once you're done with the rags, dispose them properly.
  • Collect all your tools and put them in a bucket or plastic bag, so you can clean them later.
  • Next, stand on a plastic sheet and spray yourself or your companion with water to wash down any remaining asbestos fibers. Only then will you be able to remove your respirator, gloves, boots, goggles and coveralls.
  • Place your towels, mop heads, and coverall suit and gloves in the disposal bag. You can dispose of the boots or place in a plastic bag for cleaning later. Remove the filters in your respirator and dispose of them
  • To ensure that your skin and hair is free of asbestos, immediately take a complete shower and wash carefully.

Don't Guess - Test and Have Peace of Mind!

When the dangers of asbestos became an issue, then careful vinyl flooring asbestos removal became an issue. One option is just covering asbestos flooring with the new flooring material like carpet, vinyl tiles or sheet vinyl, laminate or hardwood flooring, or even ceramic tiles and stone.

Testing for asbestos in vinyl flooring can be done by professionals or by yourself to determine “is there asbestos in my vinyl flooring” or not. Asbestos in vinyl flooring isn’t the end of the world, but asbestos and vinyl flooring do cause concern for your health. Use precaution if you elect to remove asbestos vinyl flooring so that its potential doesn’t become your reality.




Linoleum Kitchen Flooring

linoleum kitchen flooring
Linoleum kitchen flooring has numerous qualities, making it a desirable flooring product to use in the kitchen. Pluses of linoleum are that it’s environmentally friendly, the color goes all the way through the product, there are lots of colors to choose from, it’s durable, and it’s easy to take care of. The negatives of linoleum flooring are that it costs a bit more than vinyl flooring and a special linoleum glue is required to stick it to the sub-floor. Linoleum kitchen flooring may be just the right answer for your home.

Linoleum kitchen flooring has come a long way. Although many people automatically think of hospital floors when they think of linoleum, there are many beautiful patterns and colors available that can turn your kitchen into the masterpiece that you want it to be. Use your creativity and mix it up to create a kitchen floor to be proud of.

What is linoleum? Linoleum flooring is made of renewable resources like linseed oil, rosin, cork powder, wood floor, and pigments. Linoleum is not just used for flooring. It is also used as baseboards, trim, desktops, and countertops, among other uses. Although many people think of linoleum and vinyl flooring as the same thing, linoleum is ecologically friendly while vinyl flooring is not.
Linoleum is extremely durable. It is widely used commercially because of the durability and ease of maintenance. It does not scratch or scuff so it is great for high traffic areas that see a lot of wear and tear. Another great benefit of linoleum flooring is its natural bacterial resistant qualities. That’s why it is so great in rooms like the kitchen, bathroom, and the children’s rooms. Linoleum is biodegradable so when you do dispose of it, it does not harm the environment like vinyl flooring does. The environmentally friendly benefits are why many people choose linoleum flooring over vinyl flooring for their kitchen and home.
Linoleum is known as the “forty year flooring” because of its durability. In fact, over time linoleum hardens which makes it even more durable to keep it looking beautiful no matter how much traffic it receives. Since the color of linoleum goes entirely through the flooring, that means that it stays looking the same no matter what happens to it.
Installing linoleum flooring is a lot like vinyl flooring except that you will use an adhesive made especially for linoleum. It can be installed over a smooth existing floor or sub-floor for maximum installation ease. If you are unsure whether your kitchen linoleum should be installed over the existing flooring, ask your contractor, flooring installer, or at the home improvement store where you purchased your linoleum,
Caring for linoleum flooring is not that difficult. Sweeping up dirt and grit regularly will help to keep the dirt from being ground into the linoleum. Place rugs or mats at the entrances to try to alleviate some of the dirt, sand, and grit from the floors. Linoleum can be wiped clean with a damp mop. Try these tips on removing stains from linoleum.
The cost of linoleum flooring is slightly higher than the highest quality of vinyl flooring would cost you. It will last much longer than the vinyl tile though, so your money will be well spent.
Linoleum flooring comes in so many different colors and patterns. You will be able to create a beautiful floor using linoleum. Mix and match different colors with patterns to create that beautiful custom look that gives a kitchen its character and interest. Do not be afraid to make patterns and mix colors — you may find that you have created a beautiful kitchen floor that others will be envious of.